Aerobatics Display

The spectacular aerial displays are a highlight of the Regatta, with military displays, aerobatic displays and static helicopter displays a highlight. The Roulettes flew at the Royal Hobart Regatta in 2021 which was a spectacular sight. not available this year and Stan Tilley retiring after decades of outstanding displays at the Regatta.

Stan Tilley, a long time supporter and Life Member of the Royal Hobart Regatta has retired – 2019 was his final aerobatic display for Royal Hobart Regatta patrons. Thanks for a great show Stan!

Stan has been a regular performer at the Royal Hobart Regatta in his specially modified Australian-made Victa Airtourer and has let us know that 2019 was his final aerobatic performance at the Regatta.
Stan first performed aerobatics at the Royal Hobart Regatta in 1978 with Chris Sperou. By 1981 he was doing the display in his 115 Victa and except for when he was flying a ski plane in France, has been doing it ever since.

Stan Tilley

Participation of the RAAF Roulettes Fly Past, RAN Helo displays and Defence Force bands are all subject to the operational requirements of the Australian Defence Force from time to time.

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) maintains an elite formation aerobatic display team, known as “The Roulettes”, to showcase Air Force flying skills to the Australian public. Team members of The Roulettes are drawn from the flying instructors at the RAAF’s Central Flying School (CFS). The Roulettes currently fly the Pilatus PC9/A training aircraft, however the genesis of formation aerobatic teams at CFS dates back well before the introduction of the PC9/A.

In 1962, a team named “The Red Sales” was formed flying four de Havilland Vampire T33 aircraft. The Red Sales were first seen publicly at the Royal Hobart Regatta in February 1962, they also displayed at Wagga Wagga and at a School Of Air Navigation (SAN) course graduation at RAAF Base East Sale.

The Roulettes flew their first public display in December 1970 at RAAF Base Point Cook. The name ‘Roulettes’ has its origins from one of the early manoeuvres performed by the first team. Two Macchis flew in opposite directions round a horizontal circle and crossed in front of the crowd in a routine that was coined as the ‘Roulette’.